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Old Fort Jackson

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In 1808, with relations between Britain and our fledgling country quickly deteriorating, President Thomas Jefferson ordered the construction of Old Fort Jackson to protect the important port city of Savannah. Named for revolutionary hero James “Left Eye” Jackson, it was ready in time for the War of 1812, but never needed.

Fort Savannah

Decades later, with the outbreak of the Civil War, the fort was quickly seized by Confederate troops. It was a powerful deterrent against the Union army who had seized Fort Pulaski out near Tybee Island, and protected Savannah from direct attack. During the war’s final days, Sherman reached Savannah and easily seized the fort. But before abandoning Fort Jackson, the Confederates destroyed everything useful inside.

So Fort Jackson hasn’t seen much battle in its 200-year history, meaning that despite its age, it’s remarkably well-preserved. Just a few minutes from the city center, it’s a cool place to spend an hour and relive history. It was purchased by the Coastal Heritage Society in 1920 and completely restored in the 70s. Today, tourists can visit a museum in the fort’s rooms and witness a daily cannon firing.

Old Fort Jackson is less interesting than Fort Pulaski, if only because it never participated in any battles. But it’s much closer to the city, so makes a great option if you’re short on time and are itching to get into an old fort.

Location on our Savannah Map
Old Fort Jackson – Official Site

The Forts That Defended America

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Old Fort Jackson
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January 19, 2011 at 6:04 pm Comments (4)

Fort Pulaski – The South’s Not So Invincible Stronghold

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The road to Tybee Island takes you right by Cockspur Island, home to Fort Pulaski. Originally built after the War of 1812, the fort is now a national monument.

Pulaski Entrance

Fort Pulaski has been well-maintained by the National Park Service, and a visit introduces you to both its architecture and history. When Georgia seceded from the Union in 1860, confederate troops moved into the impenetrable stronghold, in order to protect the city from attack along the river. Savannah had one of the South’s most important ports, and control of Fort Pulaski guaranteed the flow of goods which were vital to the war effort.

Fort Pulaski was thought to be unassailable. There nearest solid land is over a mile away, on Tybee Island, and so the Union was unable to place cannons near enough to damage the fort. But the South didn’t know that the Yanks had a new, secret weapon: the rifled cannon. And it proved effective. After 30 hours of devastating bombardment, the white flag went up over Pulaski. Union troops secured the fort and effectively shut down Savannah as a Confederate resource. It was a huge loss for the South.

There are guided tours of the fort every day, which do a great job of bringing the fort’s fascinating history to life. And we can also recommend a walk around Cockspur Island, for the chance to spot wildlife. We saw a deer during our visit.

Fort Pulaski National Monument – Website
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Fort Pulaski
Pulaski Walls
Pulaski Draw Bridge
Pulaski Chains
Magic Waters
Pulaski Canon
Pulaski
Old Wheels
Spiffy Clean Canon
Pulaski Stairs
Pulaski Tabby
Pulaski TNT
Canon and a rope
Hooked Pulaski
Pulaski Defense
Savannah
Pulaski Chair
Sad Little Boat
Pulaski Soldier
Last Soldier Pulaski
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December 1, 2010 at 5:58 pm Comments (3)
Old Fort Jackson In 1808, with relations between Britain and our fledgling country quickly deteriorating, President Thomas Jefferson ordered the construction of Old Fort Jackson to protect the important port city of Savannah. Named for revolutionary hero James "Left Eye" Jackson, it was ready in time for the War of 1812, but never needed.

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