Savannah Map
Site Index
Contact
Random
Our Travel Books
Advertising / Press

Warren Square

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Laid out in 1791, Warren Square was named in honor of General Joseph Warren, a Revolutionary hero from Massachusetts who was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Warren Square itself looks like a battlefield, in the eternal fight between the forces of preservation and development.

Warren Square

A hulking parking lot mars the western side of the square, damaging Warren’s aesthetics and rudely truncating lovely St. Julian Street, which is notable for the oyster shells in its pavement. Turn your attention to the east, however, and an entirely different picture emerges.

On Habersham and St. Julian, there are a number of splendidly restored houses, some of which were moved here from other locations. With its Savannah gray brick, the house at 420-422 E. St. Julian is particularly striking, as it’s so isolated from other buildings. Another nicely restored house is at 24 Habersham, built in 1797 by a plantation owner from Daufuskie Island. It hosted the Marquis de Lafyette in 1825, and later served as a makeshift hospital during a yellow fever epidemic.

Warren Square itself is almost completely nondescript. There’s a pretty yard, but no statues or markers of any kind. But with its location near the river and the beauty of the homes on the east side, there are reasons swing through the square… especially since you probably parked in that hideous garage, anyway.

Location on our Savannah Map

Everyday New Savannah Coupons

Classic House Savannah
Savannah Lights
Oriental Lamp Savannah
Light Design Savannah
Savannah Album
420-422-E-St-Julian
25 Habersham Savannah
American Fence
Small House Savannah
Weed in Savannah
Little Roof Savannah
Window Holder
Statue of Happyness
Savannah Chimney
Baby Turtle

Savannah Guide Books

, , , , , , , , ,
January 25, 2011 at 12:03 pm Comment (1)

Whitefield Square

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

On Habersham and Wayne, Whitefield was one of the final squares to be laid out in Savannah, in 1851. With a distinctive gazebo in its center and gingerbread houses surrounding it, this small square feels like a throw-back to Victorian times.

Gazebo Wedding Savannah

The square was named after George Whitefield, a British priest who came to the colonies and was largely responsible for a religious movement that has become known as the First Great Awakening. The “Awakening” left a permanent imprint on American religion, by eschewing quiet contemplation and somber services in favor of loud, bombastic preaching, and by putting a heavy emphasis on personal guilt and the need for redemption. When you see present-day televangelists screaming and crying and carrying on about the devil inside all of us… well, you can thank Mr. Whitefield for that.

Whitefield also put great worth in the importance of public deeds, and did his part by establishing the Bethesda Orphanage just outside Savannah. Still in use today, this was the very first orphanage in all North America.

Whitefield Square is fun to explore, as long as you don’t mind the occasional pan-handler. The gazebo in the center could be a nice place to spend some time, but it’s currently the exclusive domain of vagabonds. Still, Whitefield is not without its charms. The Congregational Church, for example, is a handsome building. Found on the western side of the sqaure, it was consecrated in the late 19th century.

Location on our Savannah Map

Buy Your Gazebo Here

Gazebo
Whitefiled Square
Savannah Tower
Savannah Architecture
Ginger Bread Houses Savannah
Savannah Seeds
Savannah Herbs
Corner House Savannah
Savannah Porche
Savannah One Way
Savannah Lizard
Rusty Lamp
Sneaky Leaf
Savannah Fine Art
Savannah Gates
Savannah Garden
Savannah Fountain
Savannah Gates Iron
Pink and Poofy
Churches of Savannah
Brown Church
Church Glass
Church Corner
Church-Congregational
Hot Rod Savannah
, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
January 17, 2011 at 3:24 pm Comments (10)
Warren Square Laid out in 1791, Warren Square was named in honor of General Joseph Warren, a Revolutionary hero from Massachusetts who was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Warren Square itself looks like a battlefield, in the eternal fight between the forces of preservation and development.
For 91 Days