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Savannah: Five Years Later

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Five years had passed, and we thought it would be a good time to return to Savannah. We wouldn’t be staying for 91 days, this time, but just a couple weeks. We figured that should be long enough to visit our favorite spots, eat at some new restaurants and check out a few things we had missed the first time around.

A lot can change in five years. The last time we were in Savannah, we were just starting out on our travels. Savannah was only our second destination, and we were still figuring out how this whole “For 91 Days” project was going to work. Five years ago, we were different people; a little younger and a lot less experienced. Oh and back then, our dog was still alive and traveling with us!

But for a city like Savannah, five years is nothing. The first thing we did upon returning was to tour the city’s squares, and I was impressed by how little they had changed. It was almost as though we had never left. There were the same haunting mansions, the same mustached SCADsters, the same Live Oaks draped in Spanish Moss, and the same atmosphere of welcoming southern gentility. Even the same big old blues singer was in his spot at Wright Square, belting out the same interminable melodies.

In 91 days, we had been able to experience a lot of what Savannah has to offer, but there was still a lot left to do. There were things we missed, because they had been closed for renovation (Massie Heritage Center), closed for the season (Mrs. Wilkes), or because we had simply run out of time (Sorrel-Weed House). There are new restaurants, and other experiences which hadn’t existed five years ago, or which we didn’t know about.

And besides all the new things, we hoped to return to all our favorite spots. The Sentient Bean, the Olde Pink House, Bonaventure Cemetery and Tybee… Is it possible to repeat 91 experiences in ten days? I doubt it, but I’m dying to try.

The three months we spent in Savannah were among the most memorable in all our travels, and we’re happy to have returned, even if just for a short visit. So let’s catch up, Savannah! Honestly, honey, y’all look the same. The years have been kind. But tell your old friends all about it. What’s new?

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March 9, 2016 at 8:22 pm Comments (0)

Crawford Square

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Laid out in 1841, Crawford is the only of Savannah’s squares with recreational equipment: a basketball court, won by the neighborhood after a 1946 tournament. Found on Houston Street, the square was named after native son William Harris Crawford, who was Secretary of the Treasury and who unsuccessfully ran for President in 1824.

Crawford Sq Gazebo

At one time, all of Savannah’s squares were fenced in, but only Crawford remains so. It’s also retained its cistern, from the days when Savannah’s fire department kept a station in every square. The fence, the cistern and the basketball court give Crawford a unique feel. And with a gazebo in the center and azaleas which explode in bloom during the spring, Crawford definitely manages to charm.

In the days of Jim Crow, when segregation was the law of the land, Crawford was the only square which blacks were permitted to use. It’s a historically black neighborhood, and today a quiet, peaceful one. It’s also the former home of the fabulous Lady Chablis, who lived in a house bordering the square, during her rise to fame.

Location on our Savannah Map

New Savannah Sqaure
New Savannah Sqaure
New Savannah Sqaure
Basket Ball Savannah
Park Closing Times
Savannah NO NO s
Savannah Cistern
Places to Rest
Savannah Ware House
Blossom Savannah
Bushy Palm
Savannah Bling
Crying Star
Row Houses Savannah
Savannah Aloe Vera
Smurf Blood
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January 23, 2011 at 5:20 pm Comment (1)

Drayton Glassworks

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Biking home with a fresh loaf of bread from the Back in the Day Bakery, we passed a tiny shop in which someone was at work blowing glass. Curiosity stoked, we returned to the Drayton Glassworks a couple days later to meet Jonathan Poirier, a Rhode Island native who spent years in Sweden learning the art of glass blowing.

Drayton Glass Works

While heating, blowing, spinning and shaping colored glass into the form of bottles, Jon told us about his life and the shop. He’s been in Savannah since 2001, building a reputation as one of the best glass blowers in the country. Despite industrialization having long-ago made glass-crafting largely obsolete, Jon has been able to find plenty of customers looking for unique, hand-made pieces.

I was amazed that he could continue to work, not missing a stride, while carrying on a conversation with us. This is clearly something he’s been doing for a long while, and he’s able to perform the spinning, shaping and blowing almost on automatic. To us, these tasks looked insanely complicated, and I almost had a heart attack a couple times as he swung around a nearly-completed vase, without paying any attention to it.

Drayton Glass Works

When we returned to Savannah five years later, we checked in on Jon and his business. Nothing had changed; Jon was still the same friendly, funny guy, and it was great to catch up. One new thing he’s added to Drayton Glassworks is the opportunity for people to participate in workshops and create their own piece of glass-blown art. Check out his Facebook page, if you’re interested.

And definitely make sure to stop by his shop, to check out the pieces he’s made, and perhaps have a chance to see how it’s done. It’s really more a workshop than a store, and he’s always busy creating something new.

Location on our Savannah Map
Drayton Glassworks – Facebook

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Drayton Glass Works
Drayton Glass Works
Drayton Glass Works
Drayton Glass Works
Drayton Glass Works
Drayton Glass Works
Drayton Glass Works
Drayton Glass Works
Drayton Glass Works
Drayton Glass Works
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Drayton Glass Works
Drayton Glass Works
Drayton Glass Works
Jonathan Poirier

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November 24, 2010 at 12:52 pm Comments (6)
Savannah: Five Years Later Five years had passed, and we thought it would be a good time to return to Savannah. We wouldn't be staying for 91 days, this time, but just a couple weeks. We figured that should be long enough to visit our favorite spots, eat at some new restaurants and check out a few things we had missed the first time around.
For 91 Days