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Last Batch of Random Savannah Photos

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Savannah At Night

We’ve said it before, and we’ll repeat ourselves again: Savannah is a photographer’s dream. Whether you’re looking for images that are beautiful, amusing, haunting or just plain weird, you hardly have to try. Just lift your camera, click the shutter, and you’re almost guaranteed to have a compelling shot. We took tens of thousands of photographs during our three months in the city… here are a few of the better ones.

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Cathedral Savannah
Savannah Cotton
Cotton Exchange
Old Cotton Lofts
Old Church Tip Savannah
Savannah Post Cards
Pretty Savannah
Antique Window
Savannah Antiques
Big Boat Savannah
Riverfront Trolley
Trolley Entrance
Savannah Roof
Savannah Diner
Tybee Fried
Tybee Flag
Savannah Bridge
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January 27, 2011 at 1:13 pm Comments (2)

Warren Square

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Laid out in 1791, Warren Square was named in honor of General Joseph Warren, a Revolutionary hero from Massachusetts who was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Warren Square itself looks like a battlefield, in the eternal fight between the forces of preservation and development.

Warren Square

A hulking parking lot mars the western side of the square, damaging Warren’s aesthetics and rudely truncating lovely St. Julian Street, which is notable for the oyster shells in its pavement. Turn your attention to the east, however, and an entirely different picture emerges.

On Habersham and St. Julian, there are a number of splendidly restored houses, some of which were moved here from other locations. With its Savannah gray brick, the house at 420-422 E. St. Julian is particularly striking, as it’s so isolated from other buildings. Another nicely restored house is at 24 Habersham, built in 1797 by a plantation owner from Daufuskie Island. It hosted the Marquis de Lafyette in 1825, and later served as a makeshift hospital during a yellow fever epidemic.

Warren Square itself is almost completely nondescript. There’s a pretty yard, but no statues or markers of any kind. But with its location near the river and the beauty of the homes on the east side, there are reasons swing through the square… especially since you probably parked in that hideous garage, anyway.

Location on our Savannah Map

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420-422-E-St-Julian
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Weed in Savannah
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January 25, 2011 at 12:03 pm Comment (1)

Wormsloe Plantation

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Located on the Isle of Hope, just twenty minutes by car Savannah, Wormsloe Plantation is a gorgeous historic site which allows visitors to explore both a museum and a couple nature trails. And this must be one of the only sites in America whose most memorable feature is its driveway.

Wormsloe Gate

Pulling into the plantation, the scene is breathtaking. Hundreds of live oaks tower over a straight road which leads deep into the coastal forest. Speed along the path is limited to 15 mph, but most visitors will want to proceed even slower. The oaks, evenly spaced apart and draped with Spanish moss, create a scene of incredible beauty, particularly on days when the sunlight filters through the foliage.

Wormsloe was established by Noble Jones, an English official who came to Georgia with Oglethorpe and the original settlers… and who had the coolest name of any of them. And throughout the succeeding generations, this plantation has continued to provide a home to the same family. Wormsloe’s mansion is still a private residence, although it’s opened often to fundraising events and private parties. When we visited, preparations for a wedding reception were in gear.

Wormsloe Library

There’s a museum dedicated to the area, with colonial and Native American artifacts that have been found here. But we paid it scant attention, wishing to spend more time outdoors; it was a beautiful day, and Wormsloe’s walking trails were calling to us. They brought us by the tabby ruins of Noble Jones’ original residence, and the shell middens left by the Isle of Hope’s original inhabitants: the Yuchi and Creek Tribes. We even found a makeshift “Colonial Village”, complete with a wooden house and big tools used by the settlers.

Wormsloe Plantation is one of the most photographed spots in Savannah, and for good reason. The grounds are simply stunning, and its proximity to the city makes it a favorite spot for day trips. Nature lovers and history buffs (and really, just about everyone) will find plenty to enjoy, here.

Location on Map
Wormsloe Historic Site – Website

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Wormsloe
Wormsloe Georgia
Wormsloe Chimney
Wormsloe Knecht
Fake Flowers
Wormsloe Lady
Antique Inbox
Secret Gardens
Deer Statue
Frida-Renne-Barrow
Relax in Savannah
Spanish Moss House
Plantation Ruin
Wormsloe Grave
Savannah Nature
Wormsloe Palms
Wormsloe Root
Tree Skin
Travel Blogger
Lost Bird
Wormsloe Bridge
Fuzzy Moss
Mogli Jungle Book
Savannah Fall
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January 12, 2011 at 6:36 pm Comments (5)

Chatham Square

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The most southwestern of Savannah’s squares is Chatham, on the intersection of Barnard and Wayne. A residential square devoid of shops or monuments, Chatham was one of the last to be founded, in 1847.

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Both the square and Savannah’s Chatham county were named after a Brit who never once set foot in the city. William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham also counts Pittsburgh among the American places named in his honor. The Whig statesman led Britain during the Seven Years War, and was one of the few British politicians to sound alarm bells about the impending US Revolution. Though he was roundly ignored by an obtuse parliament, Pitt sought to appease the colonists before things got out of hand.

Older Savannahians often refer to Chatham Square as Barnard Square, because of the school on its northwestern side. Still the square’s most conspicuous building, the school now hosts SCAD’s Fibers Department. The rest of the buildings around Chatham are apartments, making this one of the quieter residential squares in the city. Gordon Row, on the southeastern side, is a stand out. These fifteen four-story brick townhouses were built before the Civil War, and are still used as apartments.

Location on our Savannah Map

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January 11, 2011 at 6:24 pm Comments (7)

Greene Square

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Named after revolutionary hero Nathaniel Greene, whose monument and burial site is at Johnson Square, Greene Square was laid out in the 1790s and developed into the center of Savannah’s black population. With a number of beautiful homes encircling it, it’s one of the city’s more enchanting squares.

Bachelor House Savannah

The Second African Baptist Church on the northeast side of Greene Square was built in 1802. Though destroyed by a fire and rebuilt in 1925, it retains much of its original interior, such as its benches, chairs and pulpit. This is where General Sherman famously promised to provide each freed slave “40 acres and a mule” after the Civil War.

Pay attention for signs around Greene Square, which reveal the original street names. President Street was originally King Street, and Congress Street was once called Prince Street. (After the American Revolution, we didn’t have any desire to continue honoring the monarchy.) Other signs provide information about Greene Square’s homes. The house on 521 East York Street was built from the famous Savannah gray bricks of the Hermitage Plantation, and at 124 Houston, there’s an early 19th-century wood and stucco house built by Isaiah Davenport; one of the prominent architect’s few remaining structures in Savannah.

Greene Square itself has no monuments or fountains, but is rich in contrast. And its charming houses make it one of the must-see squares in Savannah.

Location on our Savannah Map

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Savannah Jungle
Greene Square
Ginger Bread Savannah
How Many Squares in Savannah
Savannah Fern
Prince Street Savannah
President Street Savannah 1733
Savannah Chimney
Savannah Front Doors
Savannah Flames
Iron Works Savannah
Haunted Tree
The White House
1797 Hand Shake
Blue House Savannah
Gingerbread Houses Savannah
Second African Baptist Church
Baptist Church
Savannah Palms

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History of Savannah Squares
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January 9, 2011 at 7:02 pm Comments (3)

Monterey Square

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One of the most beautiful squares in Savannah is Monterey, named in honor of the Mexican-American War’s 1846 Battle of Monterey. With a memorial to Casmir Pulaski in its center, classic buildings surrounding it, and more than its share of local lore, Monterey is one of our favorites.

Monterey Square Savannah

The most famous house on Monterey Square is the Mercer-Williams House, where Jim Williams shot Danny Hansford dead, as detailed in Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. Clint Eastwood’s movie adaptation was filmed on location here, instantly making the Mercer-Williams house the most well-known in all of Savannah. Contrary to popular belief, Johnny Mercer never lived here, although it was his family that built the house.

Monterey Square Savannah

Across the square is the Congregation Mickve Israel, the only Gothic synagogue in America, with one of the oldest Jewish congregations in the USA. Oglethorpe’s colonial Georgia had welcomed Jewish immigrants with open arms, and some of the city’s original settlers were Spanish and Portuguese Jews fleeing Catholic persecution. One of them brought a handwritten copy of the Torah, known as a Sefer Torah, which is still used today for special occasions.

Just as the statue of Oglethorpe is in Chippewa and not Oglethorpe Square, the obelisk honoring revolutionary war hero Casimir Pulaski should probably be in Pulaski Square, but it’s a magnificent tribute regardless. Pulaski was Polish, and played a major part in the American Revolution, helping develop our nation’s nascent cavalry. He died in Savannah, and the city has pulled out all the stops to honor him: an obelisk, a square and even a fort out near Tybee Island.

Location on our Savannah map

The Music of Johnny Mercer

Monterey Square Savannah
Monterey Square Savannah
Monterey Square Savannah
Monterey Square Savannah
Monterey Square Savannah
Savannah Squares
This is Savannah
Walking Winter Tour
I love Savannah
Pulaski Monument
Casimir Pulaski
Pulaski Savannah
Pulaski Statue
Hell Gate
Jewish Monterey Square
Synagog Savannah
Savannah Photographer
Secret Garden Savannah
Private Garden Savannah
Evil Garden
Egypt Savannah
Arabic Savannah
Savannah Haus
Savannah Houses
Savannah Palms
United Community
Savannah Doors
Half House Savannah
Garden Good Evil Midnight
Savannah Art
Savannah 10
Savannah Cage
Savannah Shadow
Savannah Street Lights
Savannah Squares
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January 6, 2011 at 6:12 pm Comments (6)

The Andrew Low House on Lafayette Square

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Andrew Low was a Scot who moved to Savannah when he was sixteen. He entered the cotton business and, by the time he was in his thirties, had become the leader of uncle’s company and the richest man in the city. Accordingly, he built a house which would reflect his newly-acquired status on Savannah’s newest square, Lafayette.

Andrew Low House Savannah

For his new residence, Mr. Low hired John Norris, an architect who had done a number of important buildings in Savannah, including the Customs House on Bay Street. Norris designed Low’s house in the Italianate style, with a three-storied structure of stucco and brick. In 1849, the Lows moved in, and began throwing lavish dinner parties to which they invited famous guests such as William Thackery and Robert E. Lee.

The house would eventually be passed down to Juliette Gordon Low, who had married Andrew’s son William. Ms. Low is most well-known for being the founder the Girl Scouts, and the carriage house in the back yard was the site of their first meetings. Today, it’s become a sort of Mecca for the organization. Almost every time we’ve passed by, there’s a group of green-skirted girls waiting to get in.

We joined house tour, and had a great time. Every room has been wonderfully preserved, and is decked out with period furniture and ornamentation. The house is currently owned by the Colonial Dames of America, and the ladies who led our tour were as sweet as could be. Our guide answered all the questions we could muster, and were full of anecdotes about the house, the family, and the era in which they lived.

Location on our Savannah Map

Juliette Low, Girl Scout Founder

Savannah Sun Dial
Low House Savannah
Andrew Low Door
Inside Andrew Low House
Savannah Mirror
Christmas Savannah House Tour
Low House Piano
Interior Design Savannah
Ivory Art
Andrew Low Dining
Savannah Fruits
Savannah Lamp
Dragon Lamp
String Bird
Death Bed Gordon
Savannah Twin Boys
Play Room Savannah
Antique Toys Savannah
Savannah Bed
Cozy Curtains
Running Water Savannah
Sad Lion
Low House Church
Iron House Savannah
Savannah Berries
Low House Fence
Low House Eagle
USA Blossom
Visitors Andrew Low House
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January 5, 2011 at 6:47 pm Comments (4)

Oglethorpe Square

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Oglethorpe Square was laid out in 1742, the last of the six squares that were originally planned for Savannah. It was originally known as Upper New Square, but that bland name was soon tossed out in favor of a tribute to Georgia’s colonial founder, James Oglethorpe.

Ogletherpe Square

The statue of James Oglethorpe perhaps got lost on the way to its eternal home, and can be found in nearby Chippewa Square. The only monument to be found in Oglethorpe Square is a small pilaster honoring the Moravian immigrants who moved to Savannah during the colony’s founding. Otherwise, it’s just oaks, grass, benches and Spanish moss.

Oglethorpe is beautiful and restful, but not among the most impressive of Savannah’s squares. The main features are the Regency-style Owens Thomas House, on the eastern trust lot, and the President’s Quarters Inn to the southeast. On the western trust lot are a couple of handsome brick buildings.

Location of Oglethorpe Square on our Savannah Map

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Ogletherpe Square
Ogletherpe Square
Ogletherpe Square
Ogletherpe Square
Winter Shorts
Oglethorp Sq
Bushy Savannah
Broken Lamp
Iron Cast Balcony
Iron Fence Savannah
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January 4, 2011 at 4:15 pm Comments (10)

Crazy Taxi Drivers and Other Savannah Characters

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In most cities, you hail down a taxi and drive in silence to your destination. At best, the driver comments on the weather, or is talking on his cell phone in a language you don’t understand. You’ll pay your fare and think how uneventful and efficient that taxi ride was, if you think of it at all.

A link to all things "New York Taxi"

That’s not often the case in Savannah. The profession of “taxi driver” is famously a draw for eccentrics and, in a city full of eccentrics, you really get the crème de la crème. Every time we hailed a cab in Savannah, it was a memorable experience. There was the unappreciated poet who insisted we read his work before we left the car. The guy who had met Paula Deen’s husband and talked bitterly about how jealous he was. Or the freakishly huge, bearded dude telling us about the trouble he got into at his favorite Gentlemen’s Club.

Of course, taxi drivers aren’t Savannah’s only larger-than-life characters. We hardly went a day without encountering another strange and charismatic person. From just the past week, I can recall the bug-eyed tour guide more interested in discussing conspiracy theories than giving a tour, the soft-spoken rasta dude who suddenly revealed the six-foot dreadlocks rolled up inside his hat, the guy who’s become a local celebrity for his perfect Forrest Gump impression (and it really was perfect), and the grumpy bartender who we saw threw three different dudes out of her bar.

Maybe Jürgen and I fit right in here. We were talking to someone about what we do… how we travel around the world for 91 days at a time, and don’t really have a home… and she said something like, “You guys are crazy!” It took me off guard. I mean, this was an Asian woman with a deep Southern drawl and dyed green hair, wearing fishnet stockings, and chewing tobacco… and we’re the crazy ones?! Heh. But maybe there’s some truth to that… and it could be why we felt so at home in Savannah.

Pirate’s House in Savannah
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January 3, 2011 at 10:25 am Comments (2)

Seeing Savannah’s Evil Side from a Hearse

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What could be better than touring Savannah in a hearse with a raised roof, so you can poke your head out the top? Nothing comes immediately to mind, does it? I mean, a ghost tour in a tricked-out hearse is kind of like the pinnacle of human culture.

Ghost Tour Savannah

I didn’t know what to think the first time I saw this bizarre vehicle cruising around Savannah’s squares at night. The passengers seemed to be having a grand time, drinking out of to-go cups, gawking at old mansions, and completely oblivious to my baffled staring. “On the one hand,” I thought, “that’s the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever seen.”

“On the other hand, my parents are totally going to love it.”

So when my parents came to visit, I booked spots on the Hearse Tour, arranging for a pick-up outside the Pirate’s House. What ensued was an entertaining trip around Savannah’s dark side. Our guide was completely into her character as spooky chauffeur, and her enthusiasm for the supernatural was contagious. There wasn’t a dull moment; a lot of houses in Savannah have some story of fright, whether a horrific crime or an unexplained phenomena. A lot of the tales were new to me, and I felt chills when we went by the old psychiatric hospital on Abercorn. It might have been the booze, but I swear I saw the outline of a face in one of the hospital windows.

The Hearse Tour isn’t exactly inconspicuous. I lost count of how many pedestrians laughed at us, yelling “Oooooooh, spooooky!” But if you’re able to tune out the mockery, it’s a great time, especially if you’ve got an interest in the supernatural.

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December 31, 2010 at 3:38 pm Comments (5)

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Last Batch of Random Savannah Photos We've said it before, and we'll repeat ourselves again: Savannah is a photographer's dream. Whether you're looking for images that are beautiful, amusing, haunting or just plain weird, you hardly have to try. Just lift your camera, click the shutter, and you're almost guaranteed to have a compelling shot. We took tens of thousands of photographs during our three months in the city... here are a few of the better ones.
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