Spanish Moss: Neither Spanish nor Moss

I clearly remember the first time we entered Savannah, and turned onto 37th Street, where we would be living for three months. Huge oak trees canopied the street and random rays of sunlight squeezed past the Spanish moss, which hung apathetically off branches like the embodiment of sorrow. Years from now, when I shut my eyes and think "Savannah," Spanish moss washed in sunlight will be what I see.

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Pulaski Square

Laid out in 1837 and named in honor of the Polish revolutionary hero, Casimir Pulaski, who died during the Siege of Savannah, Pulaski Square is another of Barnard Street's quiet, residential squares.

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Ellis Square

Laid out in 1733, Ellis Square has the distinction of being one of Oglethorpe's original four squares, along with Johnson, Telfair and Wright. It also has the distinction of being the most singularly ugly of all Savannah's squares.

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Skidaway Island

Skidaway Island is one of Savannah's larger coastal islands, found just past the Isle of Hope. Home to a state park popular with campers, it provides yet another great escape from the city.

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Wormsloe Plantation

Located on the Isle of Hope, just twenty minutes by car Savannah, Wormsloe Plantation is a gorgeous historic site which allows visitors to explore both a museum and a couple nature trails. And this must be one of the only sites in America whose most memorable feature is its driveway.

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Greene Square

Named after revolutionary hero Nathaniel Greene, whose monument and burial site is at Johnson Square, Greene Square was laid out in the 1790s and developed into the center of Savannah's black population. With a number of beautiful homes encircling it, it's one of the city's more enchanting squares.

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Telfair Square

Originally called St. James Square after the famous London park, Telfair Square was renamed in 1833 in honor of Savannah's VIP-iest family. It was one the city's original four squares and, for a long time, its most fashionable district.

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Washington Square

The most northeastern of Savannah's squares, Washington is a lovely garden in a quiet residential neighborhood. It was named in honor of our first president, who visited the city shortly after his election.

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