Savannah Travel Blog And Guide - For 91 Days

For 91 Days, the southern jewel of Savannah, Georgia, was our winter home. From beautiful squares to historic houses, unforgettable restaurants and an eccentric cast of characters that could be (and actually is) straight out of a novel, we tried to capture everything that makes Savannah so special. Start reading from the beginning of our journey, or skip to the end. Visit the comprehensive index of everything we wrote about, or just check out a few posts, selected at random, below:

Updated 2016 Edition!! We’ve converted our three-month blog about Savannah into an exclusive e-book. For 91 Days in Savannah contains all of our articles and 195 of our best pictures, in full-color. With categorical and alphabetical indexes, locations, links to the original blog posts, and cross-references spread throughout, the e-book is a perfect companion for a trip to Savannah.

We had 24 squares to explore during our time in Savannah, and decided to start with the oldest and largest. Johnson Square was established in 1733, and named in honor of South Carolina’s colonial governor Robert Johnson.

On New Year’s Eve, we were invited into the home of an old-school Savannahian. Our soft-spoken host, Alvin, was a true southern gentleman, as gracious as possible, and both his character and his house seemed to be straight from the pages of some Victorian Gothic novel.

Opened in 1856, the Massie School may have been the city’s first public school, but many of Savannah’s aspiring students would have to wait eleven more years for the founding of the Beach Institute: Savannah’s first school specifically for black children. Today, the school has moved into a more modern facility, and the old house has evolved into a cultural center and gallery.



Our first month in Savannah had come to an end, faster than expected, and it was fun, weird and exciting as we hoped it would be. As we did after our first month in Oviedo, we completed a small self-survey of our experience, to share our initial impressions of the city.

Located on Calhoun Square, the Massie School opened its doors in 1856, and was the first public school in Georgia. Today, it’s been converted into the Massie Heritage Center, featuring an overview of Savannah’s unique urban planning, and exhibits dedicated to the most important aspects of the city’s culture, from architecture to the Native American influence.

In Savannah, every time you step out of the house, you’re going to see something strange and beautiful. In the right frame of mind, the entire city becomes an art gallery… and whether your preferred form of art is architecture, graffiti, fashion or performance art, you’re bound to see something you like.