Monthly Archives:January 2011

Thanks for the Memories, Y’all!

This might be a city which moves slow, but our three months here flew by at a breakneck pace. Savannah had been a friendly, wild and unforgettable place to temporarily call home, and we couldn’t have hoped to have chosen a better city.


Reynolds Square

At the top of Abercorn Street is Reynolds Square, originally laid out in 1734 as Lower New Square, but renamed in honor of the Royal Governor John Reynolds.


Last Batch of Random Savannah Photos

We’ve said it before, and we’ll repeat ourselves again: Savannah is a photographer’s dream. Whether you’re looking for images that are beautiful, amusing, haunting or just plain weird, you hardly have to try. Just lift your camera, click the shutter, and you’re almost guaranteed to have a compelling shot. We took tens of thousands of photographs during our three months in the city… here are a few of the better ones.


SCAD – The Savannah College of Art and Design

Before moving to Savannah, we didn’t know much about the city. And although we weren’t expecting to find a Victorian-era scenario, with Southern belles strolling the streets and coquettishly dropping their handkerchiefs to attract the attention of menfolk, we also weren’t prepared to find the streets dominated by pink-haired girls and hipsters with ironic mustaches. In other words: we had no idea about the existence of SCAD.


The Schnitzel Shack of Rincon (via Darmstadt)

One of the first things Jürgen did when we got to Savannah was type “German Restaurant” into Google. The nearest place bore the tongue-twisty name of Schnitzel Shack, and was a half-hour away in a town called Rincon (rhymes with Lincoln).


Madison Square

Madison Square, on Bull Street between Chippewa and Monterey Square, is possibly the most monumental in Savannah. With a magnificent tribute to William Jasper as its centerpiece, Madison offers a wealth of things to see and do.


Laurel Grove Cemeter(ies)

Less heralded than Bonaventure Cemetery on Whitemarsh Island, but nearly as beautiful and free from almost any tourist presence, the twin cemeteries of Laurel Grove North and Laurel Grove South are nice places to spend a quiet afternoon among the dead.


The Lady Chablis at Club One

Alright, we did it. We went to Club One, to watch the Lady Chablis do her thing. The show was too expensive and the lip-syncing performers were of varying quality. But the Lady was fabulous.


Old Sheldon Church

About half-an-hour north of Beaufort, there’s a place in the woods which has become one of the low country’s favorite secrets. The ruins of the Old Sheldon Church are found down a tiny road, in a forest of towering oaks draped in Spanish moss.


Warren Square

Laid out in 1791, Warren Square was named in honor of General Joseph Warren, a Revolutionary hero from Massachusetts who was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Warren Square itself looks like a battlefield, in the eternal fight between the forces of preservation and development.


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