For 91 Days in Savannah

Anecdotes and advice from three months living in the city

For 91 Days, the southern jewel of Savannah, Georgia, was our winter home. From beautiful squares to historic houses, unforgettable restaurants and an eccentric cast of characters that could be (and actually is) straight out of a novel, we tried to capture everything that makes Savannah so special.

Savannah Countdown

With three weeks left in Savannah, we already had our flights to Buenos Aires booked and were starting to look forward to our next adventure. But there was still a lot left to do and see, here in Georgia, including going through the thousands of pictures we had taken over the past couple months. Here are some of the better shots, from the city and Tybee Island.

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The Savannah History Museum

Found in the old railway shed of the Central of Georgia, the Savannah History Museum is a good place to stop for an overview of the city's development through the ages.

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Greene Square

Named after revolutionary hero Nathaniel Greene, whose monument and burial site is at Johnson Square, Greene Square was laid out in the 1790s and developed into the center of Savannah's black population. With a number of beautiful homes encircling it, it's one of the city's more enchanting squares.

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Monterey Square

One of the most beautiful squares in Savannah is Monterey, named in honor of the Mexican-American War's 1846 Battle of Monterey. With a memorial to Casmir Pulaski in its center, classic buildings surrounding it, and more than its share of local lore, Monterey is one of our favorites.

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The Andrew Low House on Lafayette Square

Andrew Low was a Scot who moved to Savannah when he was sixteen. He entered the cotton business and, by the time he was in his thirties, had become the leader of uncle's company and the richest man in the city. Accordingly, he built a house which would reflect his newly-acquired status on Savannah's newest square, Lafayette.

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Chef Jerome and The Old School Diner

One of the area's best-kept secrets is found a half hour south of Savannah, in the small village of Townsend: The Old School Diner, owned and operated by Chef Jerome. A couple friends invited us to the restaurant, where we enjoyed some deliciously unhealthy food, and had a rollicking good time that won't be forgotten.

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Oglethorpe Square

Oglethorpe Square was laid out in 1742, the last of the six squares that were originally planned for Savannah. It was originally known as Upper New Square, but that bland name was soon tossed out in favor of a tribute to Georgia's colonial founder, James Oglethorpe.

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In Love with Savannah

It started as a crush. Like gum-smacking girls, giggling together at their lockers while the dreamy blue-eyed quarterback passes by, we were initially just obsessed by Savannah's beauty. But over the course of months, we learned that this city isn't just superficially gorgeous. It's got a rich history, fabulous people and a unique vibe all its own. Yep, Savannah is a keeper.

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Crazy Taxi Drivers and Other Savannah Characters

In most cities, you hail down a taxi and drive in silence to your destination. At best, the driver comments on the weather, or is talking on his cell phone in a language you don't understand. You'll pay your fare and think how uneventful and efficient that taxi ride was, if you think of it at all.

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Seeing Savannah’s Evil Side from a Hearse

What could be better than touring Savannah in a hearse with a raised roof, so you can poke your head out the top? Nothing comes immediately to mind, does it? I mean, a ghost tour in a tricked-out hearse is kind of like the pinnacle of human culture.

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Columbia Square

Although it was neglected throughout much of its history, like most of the city's eastern side, Columbia Square has now enjoyed a thorough restoration to become one of Savannah's loveliest spots.

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Colonial Park Cemetery

A historical marker in Savannah's Colonial Park Cemetery reports that "nearly 700" victims of the 1820 yellow fever epidemic are buried there. In fact, exactly six-hundred and sixty-six people died of the disease. But the church had issues with putting the Number of the Beast on a sign, and demanded the figure be rounded up.

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