For 91 Days in Savannah

Anecdotes and advice from three months living in the city

For 91 Days, the southern jewel of Savannah, Georgia, was our winter home. From beautiful squares to historic houses, unforgettable restaurants and an eccentric cast of characters that could be (and actually is) straight out of a novel, we tried to capture everything that makes Savannah so special.

Arrrr, Matey! Dinner at the Pirate’s House

The Pirate's House, on the northeastern corner of Savannah, is thought to be Georgia's oldest building, and is certainly one of its most famous. Captain Flint, from Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island, is said to have died here after drinking too much rum.

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The Telfair Academy

Found on on the eastern side of Telfair Square, the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences occupies a Regency style mansion built in 1818. It's been a public art museum since 1886, which makes it the oldest in the South.

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Chippewa Square

Alright, Savannah, what's going on here? The obelisk in honor of Nathanial Greene isn't in Greene Square, as might be assumed, but Johnson. The statue of James Oglethorpe isn't Oglethorpe Square, but in the middle of Chippewa Square! And Chippewa Square is named after the Battle of Chippawa, but the name is misspelled ever-so-slightly. Are you trying to confuse us? Or are you just confused yourself?

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Photos from Savannah: Red Doors and More

The biggest mistake you can make in Savannah is forgetting to bring your camera with you when you leave the house. Unique photo opportunities spring up like clockwork in this city! Jürgen brought his everywhere -- to the supermarket, on walks with our dog, and even to the bar. You never know when this city is going to surprise you with a great snapshot.

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Pinkie Master’s Lounge

Let's be honest here. Pinkie Master's Lounge is great, but it's not the kind of bar you're going to take home and introduce to your parents. You won't be taking Pinkie Master's to the Olde Pink House for an awkward first date, and you would never conceive of one day marrying it. Pinkie Master's just isn't that kind of bar. But on those late weekend nights, after respectable joints have closed up, and you're not yet ready for bed... when you're still looking for a good time... Pinkie Master's knows what ya want. Pinkie Master's got what ya need.

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Savannah Icy Winter Dream

When we chose Savannah as our next destination, it was partly because of the weather. In December, the average is supposed to be between 40 and 63°F. So, I never expected to encounter a frozen fountain in Forsyth Park. It's a beautiful sight, and one that's relatively rare, so we're happy to have seen it. But we're done, now. Could someone please give us back the warm weather we had been promised?

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Captain Mike’s Dolphin Adventure

I'll admit it. I was already partial to Captain Mike's Dolphin Adventure, out on Tybee Island, because I like anything featuring my own name. Mike & Ike's? Delicious. Michael Jackson? The greatest ever. Mike the Headless Chicken? Best headless chicken ever. Mikes rule, and so it was no surprise to discover that Captain Mike's Dolphin Adventure was totally awesome.

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Cool Coffee at the Sentient Bean

Savannah's coolest cafe has long been the Sentient Bean. That is, if you measure a cafe's coolness by its hipster quotient. For us fashion-challenged, self-conscious non-hipsters, the Sentient Bean might be Savannah's most stressful cafe. Still cool, though.

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Calhoun Square

Calhoun Square was named after the South Carolina statesman John C. Calhoun, who was our seventh Vice President, and served under both John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson. He was fiercely pro-slavery and was one of the leading proponents of Southern secession: views which apparently won him respect in Savannah, who named their newest square after him, one year after his death in 1850.

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Lafayette Square

Lafayette Square, on the intersection of Abercorn and Macon, is named in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette, the French aristocrat who became a major Revolutionary War hero and impressed Savannah with a speech delivered from the balcony of the Owens Thomas House.

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